1.A.1.b Petroleum Refining

Last updated on 24 Jan 2013 17:05 by Kevin Hausmann

Short description

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Source catagory Petroleum Refining (1.A.1.b) comprises both refinery heating plants and electricity and heat production of refinery power plants.

NFR-Code Name of Category Method AD EF Key Source for (by)
1.A.1.b Petroleum Refining T2 NS CS SOx (L), Cd (L)

Method

Activity data

Fuel inputs for electricity production in refinery power stations are included in Energy Balance line 12 ("Industrial thermal power stations"). Energy Balance line 38 shows energy consumption (for heat production) of refineries. Fuel inputs for heat production in refinery power plants and for bottom heating in refinery processes, are derived from these figures.
Activity rates for refineries for fuel inputs for electricity and heat production in petroleum refining are determined by combining the national statistics of the Federal statistical Office (DESTATIS) and the Federal Office of Economics and Export Control (BAFA).
Energy inputs in facilities for used-oil processing are reported under 1.A.1.c - Other transformation sector.

Emission factors

The emission factors for refinery power plants have been taken from the research project "Determination and evaluation of emission factors for combustion systems in Germany for the years 1995, 2000 and 2010". A detailed description of the procedure is presented in Chapter: 1.A.1.a - Public Electricity And Heat Production.
Emission factors are available for different fuel types and combustion technologies. The distinction between refinery power plants and bottom heating in refinery processes is necessary since bottom heating systems have considerably higher specific emissions.

Trend discussion for Key Sources

The following diagram gives an overview of the fuel consumption in the refinery sector.

Since 1990, fuel consumption has shown a slightly increasing trend overall. While some relevant installations have been decommisioned since 1990 - especially in the territory of the former GDR - production increased nevertheless. And while installation efficiencies were improved, increased production of lighter petroleum products and intensified hydrosulphurisation, which led to increases in specific fuel consumptions. Annual fluctuations of all fuel types can be explained as the result of differences in production quantities. The maximum production of petroleum products to date, totalling 123.6 million t, occured in 2005, as a result of a shortfall in capacity in the USA, which led to an increase in imports. Thereafter, production decreased by reducing excess capacities like everywhere in Europe.

Recalculations

Recalculations were necessary for the latest reference year (2009) due to the availability of the National Energy Balance. Germany has a federal structure which causes a time lack of the National Energy Balance. Therefore recalculations are always necessary.

Planned improvements

It´s planned to revise SO2 emission factors and to continue comparing data with PRTR and ETS.

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